Nature Photography Challenge (wild creatures, plants and places only)

A regular photography contest for Nature lovers who love to learn and teach.

(Insects, Spiders & Other Category) - Suborder - Apocrita - Wasps

This challenge closed over 3 years ago.

The Challenge

The 14th in our new challenge layout catering for all aspects of nature for us nature lovers.

The challenge theme is at the end of the title we are only looking for the land variety not marine or fresh water.

For this challenge please add your images of WASPS.

Interesting Facts

> Almost every pest insect species has at least one wasp species that preys upon it or parasitizes it, making wasps critically important in natural control of their numbers, or natural biocontrol. Parasitic wasps are increasingly used in agricultural pest control as they prey mostly on pest insects and have little impact on crops.

> The majority of wasp species (well over 100,000 species) are “parasitic” (technically known as parasitoids), and the ovipositor is used simply to lay eggs, often directly into the body of the host.

> The most familiar wasps belong to Aculeata, a division of Apocrita, whose ovipositors are adapted into a venomous sting, though a great many aculeate species do not sting.

> A much narrower and simpler but popular definition of the term wasp is any member of the aculeate family Vespidae, which includes (among others) the genera known in North America as yellowjackets (Vespula and Dolichovespula) and hornets (Vespa); in many countries outside of the Western Hemisphere, the vernacular usage of wasp is even further restricted to apply strictly to yellowjackets (e.g., the “common wasp”).

> The various species of wasps fall into one of two main categories: solitary wasps and social wasps. Adult solitary wasps live and operate alone, and most do not construct nests; all adult solitary wasps are fertile. By contrast, social wasps exist in colonies numbering up to several thousand individuals and build nests—but in some cases not all of the colony can reproduce. In some species, just the wasp queen and male wasps can mate, whilst the majority of the colony is made up of sterile female workers.

> The following characteristics are present in most wasps:

Two pairs of wings (except wingless or brachypterous forms in all female Mutillidae, Bradynobaenidae, many male Agaonidae, many female Ichneumonidae, Braconidae, Tiphiidae, Scelionidae, Rhopalosomatidae, Eupelmidae, and various other families).

An ovipositor, or stinger (which is only present in females because it derives from the ovipositor, a female sex organ).

Few or no thickened hairs (in contrast to bees); except Mutillidae, Bradynobaenidae, Scoliidae.

Nearly all wasps are terrestrial; only a few specialized parasitic groups are aquatic.

Predators or parasitoids, mostly on other terrestrial insects; most species of Pompilidae (e.g. tarantula hawks), specialize in using spiders as prey, and various parasitic wasps use spiders or other arachnids as reproductive hosts.

Information courtesy of Wikipedia

Judging / Voting Criteria

Vote for your favourite!

Rewards & Prizes

1st place winners will have their photo used as the group Avatar for a period of time.
Then 1st, 2nd and 3rd will have their photo’s posted on the groups Feature Board.
1st place member will be become a featured member.

Additional Information

PLEASE ADD YOUR IMAGE TO THE GROUP, IMAGES THAT ARE NOT ADDED TO THE GROUP WILL RISK NOT BEING FEATURED IF YOU WIN

Cover Image: Yellow Jackets At Work by Doty

Completed

The Top Ten

Yellow Jackets At Work by Doty

Yellow Jackets At Work by Doty was voted the most popular entry in this challenge with 4 votes.

  • Common wasp close-up by Gabor Pozsgai
  • Wasp by Bine
  • I give up..... by Yool
  • A wasp is born by Hans Bax
  • Thirsty Wasp by Agro Films
  • Bold by KatsEyePhoto

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